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Bhutan's Daily Newspaper
Updated: 37 min 3 sec ago

Govt will introduce enabling FDI policy for agriculture sector

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 14:06

Dechen Dolkar

Recognisng the importance of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in the agriculture sector, the government will introduce a bold policy, where Bhutan is ready for business.

Bhutan is dedicated to business-friendly policies, reflecting its commitment to open markets. The country has an uncompromising focus on long-term sustainability for the well-being of people and the planet; and leverages dynamic opportunities.

During the opening of the Bhutan Agrifood Trade and Investment Forum (BAFIT) 2024 yesterday, the Minister for Industry, Commerce, and Employment, Namgyal Dorji, presented enabling policies for investment in agrifood systems transformation in Bhutan.

Lyonpo said that Bhutan was making strategic policy moves to create an environment that is not only business-friendly but also deeply rooted in sustainable and ethical practices.

Lyonpo also said that government would soon announce bold FDI policy change where reforms are underway.

The upcoming revision of the FDI policy is expected to bring a much-needed paradigm shift, enhancing the investment environment and making it more appealing to investors.

The government also aims to increase FDI to over Nu 100 billion by 2029 from the current Nu 60 billion.

While presenting an enabling policy for investment in the agrifood system, Lyonpo said that the government proposed to allow up to 100 percent foreign ownership, where foreign investors can establish FDI companies in the agriculture sector without requiring a local partner.

Previously, foreign investment in this sector was owned at 74 percent.

Lyonpo said that agriculture was one of the priority sectors where FDI is strongly encouraged. Investments are allowed in both the cultivation and processing of agricultural products. This sector is identified as a high priority for fiscal incentives.

Investors will be able to repatriate dividends and capital without any restrictions and will have unrestricted access to foreign exchange for the import of capital goods and operational expenses.

“The government also proposed to relax provisions related to land access, especially in the agri-food sector,” Lyonpo said.

This includes extending lease terms and improving access to state land for long-term leases.

To ensure that FDI companies do not face challenges due to a lack of local expertise, the government will allow the employment of foreign expatriates without any restrictions on the maximum capacity.

Additionally, foreign investors will be provided with investor cards, granting them the right to reside in the country.

Currently, the country has two FDIs in agriculture,  Mountain Hazelnut Venture, which first started in the eastern part of the country and now brings together over 8,000 smallholder farmers across 19 districts, and Druk Metho, an EU-certified organic farm in Punakha, which partners with Swiss Alpine Herb to grow, process, and export edible flowers to Europe.

Lyonpo said that these ventures highlighted Bhutan’s unique agricultural potential and ability to create niche markets worldwide.

“These foreign investment ventures are empowering our farmers and weaving together a powerful narrative of resilience, innovation, and the transformative power of collaboration,” Lyonpo said.

Lyonpo said that India and Bangladesh have made Bhutan overcome the tyranny of geography.

The government values the partnership of the private sector and foreign investors in the country’s economic transformation journey.

Similarly, under the HiHi investment initiative, Bhutan has identified six food value chain interventions which include, citrus mandarin, quinoa, rainbow trout, black pepper, organic asparagus and organic strawberry. The interventions include production and postharvest management interventions.

The Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock in collaboration with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Employment, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and External Trade, the Bhutan Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Food Agriculture Organisation, and the European Union, is organising the BATIF 2024 from May 15 to 19 in Thimphu.

The main purpose of the Forum is to bring together Bhutanese and foreign investors, traders, business enterprises, entrepreneurs, exporters, and financial institutions to explore possibilities of partnership in Bhutanese agri-food trade and investment.

RNR Strategy 2040 aims to transform agriculture sector

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 14:02

YK Poudel

The RNR Strategy 2040 of Bhutan outlines plans to ensure sustainable social and economic wellbeing for the Bhutanese people through adequate access to food and natural resources by 2040. The report was published recently.

The agriculture sector in Bhutan struggles because of a lack of adequate investment in resources, technological innovation, internal processes, and uncoordinated projects among agencies.

The strategy highlights the key challenges in the renewable natural resources (RNR) sector, which is one of the five important drivers of economic development in terms of its potential to ensure self-reliance.

The contribution of the RNR, the primary sector, to GDP, steadily declined from 38 percent in 1992 to 14.67 percent in 2022.

However, in 2022, the manufacturing (secondary) and service (tertiary) sectors made substantial contributions to GDP with growth rates of 5.6 percent and 6.62 percent, respectively.

By 2034, the agriculture and livestock sector will have to feed about 837,288 people, which calls for timely intervention to the challenges.

 

Challenges

According to the Food and Nutrition Security Policy of Bhutan 2023, the absence of a comprehensive human resource plan, including development and deployment, has led to a decline in public investment, resulting in weak monitoring and evaluation.

Technological challenges, such as the cost of production and the adaptability of improved technologies in the country, exacerbate the issue.

Similarly, weak institutional linkages and coordination have posed challenges and duplicated work. “For example, every agency emphasises smallholder farming projects, neglecting the larger projects,” the strategy states.

The key challenges for the production and consumption in agriculture at the grassroots level includes labour shortages, feminisation of agriculture, an ageing farming population, human-wildlife conflicts, and a changing climate.

 

Looking ahead

Sustainable agriculture in Bhutan is an important factor for socioeconomic development and growth.

As Bhutan addresses its lapses, the approach is an investment in the sustainable utilisation of high-value resources for food security and livelihood.

Bhutan is approximately 70 percent food self-sufficient. There is high demand for Bhutanese products with the potential for capturing international markets given serious marketing.

Research shows that about 24 percent of the agricultural land is mechanised, while the remaining 76 percent is still cultivated using traditional methods.

Although agriculture’s contribution to GDP is declining, it provides employment and livelihood to more than 54 percent of the population. Additionally, it meets more than 70 percent of domestic food requirement and raw materials for agro-based industries.

To transform the sector, the RNR Strategy 2040 proposes eleven strategies. They are enhancing production and quality of RNR commodities, enhancing the contribution of the RNR sector to the national economy, accelerating agri-business development and expansion, developing enabling policies for the RNR sector, strengthening research, innovation and dissemination, instituting efficient RNR service delivery, enhancing production efficiency of RNR commodities, promoting research and innovation, diversifying sustainable financing for RNR sector development, mainstreamingsustainable management of natural resources, and enhancing and promoting resilience to the impacts of climate change.

Implementing these strategies will require Nu 7,545 million by 2025, Nu 7,855 million by 2030, and Nu 6,241 million by 2040, together totalling Nu 21,641 million.

The first Five-year Plan between 1961 and 1966 coincided with the Green Revolution of the 1960s, which provided access to high-yielding crop varieties and production technologies.

According to the Department of Agriculture reports, model farms, seed farms, research stations, and extension work were started. Furthermore, the export of agricultural commodities, such as apples, mandarin, potatoes, cardamom, ginger, betelnut, and vegetables in the region is being implemented.

To boost the export, the report suggests investment in improving quality standards including volume requirements, consistency, and packaging of produce.

Bhutan is projected to be a high-income country by 2034 with a GDP of USD 10 billion, up from USD 2.3 billion in 2021.

Bhutan and Czech Republic relations

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 14:02

Our reporter Sherab Lhamo interviews the Ambassador of the Czech Republic to Bhutan, residence in New Delhi, Eliska Zigova, regarding the Bhutan-Czech Republic relationship and the future prospects

What are the primary objectives of your visit to Bhutan?

This visit is my third visit to Bhutan. So, it’s always a different object, different goal. So, if you talk about this particular visit, it was the opening of our Honorary Consulate. It means the Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic is now officially open and functioning in Thimphu.

Last year, Your Excellency had a productive five-day visit to Bhutan, where you met with His Majesty The King. During that time, you expressed the Czech Republic’s keen interest in further strengthening ties between our nations, particularly in the areas of education, technology transfer, and economic cooperation. We would appreciate an update on any developments in these areas since your last visit.

Well, since my last visit, we have had a few very concrete updates. We have a few projects in research and also cyber security. The Czech Republic now is developing its cyber security.  But also in fields of education, science, and research, we look to collaborate.

Regarding education, it is about exchange of students. We have a very nice exchange system; it is very encouraging. We look to expand one these areas.

Regarding the updates now, I hope that it will be much more effective with having the Honorary Consul. Because we were working from Delhi, and it’s not so easy.  Now we will have a direct line ofcontact with our colleague, which is Honorary Consul, Tenzing Yonten here. So I think it will be much more efficient.

But as I said, there are updates in education, cyber security, and the rest we will follow. We are very much interested in the vision of His Majesty the King and  this Mindfulness City.

Building upon the existing foundation of friendship, how can our two countries further strengthen our relationship, especially in the mutually-beneficial areas of education, technology transfer, and economic exchange?

Well, I think we need much more contacts, people-to-people, and business-to-business. The point is that we can arrange different MOU, or we can speak like diplomats and politics on the level, but then it has to go deeper to the concrete actions, which, again, I really hope with our consulate here it will go more smoothly. We really would like to work on the higher level visit, from Bhutan to Czech, or vice versa. It’s not easy to work because of the distance. On the other side, mutual interest is really honest and based on real interest. So we will try to organise some business forums or exchanges of not only students.

Is there anything you would like to share with us regarding your visit or the relationship between our two countries?

I would like, first of all, to share my very warm feeling about Bhutan, which is new. Bhutan is very popular in the Czech Republic. People are interested in what’s going on in Bhutan. There was not much travelling because it wasn’t easy in the past, but we will see how the tourism will go from both sides. But yes, there is a kind of fascination with Bhutan, to be very honest.

Your country is unique and, today, we saw this opening ceremony. It’s not only the official signing and handshakes, but a kind of spiritual ceremony, which I think is something which Bhutan can in future share with the Czech Republic and world, because we need it very much.

Woman leader stands between tigers and livestock

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 14:01

Yangyel Lhaden

Amid the flurry of preparations for the Sustainable Finance for Tiger Landscapes (SFTL) conference, one figure stands out as a testament to striking a balance between tiger conservation and protecting livestock. She is determined to deliver a speech that resonates with the audience.

Pema Lhamo, the gup of Nubi gewog in Trongsa, was to take the stage on the final day of the conference to offer insights into living alongside tigers and highlight the unique challenges her community faced.

The SFTL conference, held over two days in April under the Royal Patronage of Her Majesty The Gyaltsuen, was dedicated to raising USD one billion by 2034.

For years since she served as the mangmi before becoming the gup, Pema Lhamo has been at the forefront of tiger conservation efforts in her gewog. She manages all tiger-related cases and actively participates in national and international conferences. She aims to safeguard both tigers and people’s livelihoods through conservation initiatives.

Back in the village, villagers rallied behind their gup, expressing pride in her representation and hoping her speech would garner much-needed support for the village.

Nubi Gup Pema Lhamo (Photo: WWF)

In recent years, Bhutan witnessed a surge in human-wildlife conflicts, particularly in Trongsa, where 580 cases were reported between 2020 and 2024, with Nubi Gewog alone accounting for 360 cases. Bhutan’s tiger population reached 131 in 2023 from 103 in 2015.

Some 5,000 residents of 25 villages in Nubi heavily depend on farming and livestock. Although tigers frequently attack their livestock, the religious community refrains from harming the big cat, citing cultural reasons.

Tigers have spared no household in the gewog. Livestock losses to tigers have increased in proportion to the rising tiger population. Whenever a tiger growls, the entire village grinds to a halt. When there is a kill, fear-stricken cattle refuse to graze in the forest. Villagers band together, making loud noises to drive the predator back into the forest.

Whenever tigers attack livestock, people use honorific phrases such as “mem pham or mem sangay joen nu”, meaning “the grandpa buddha has come”, or “mem pham or mem sangay gi zhay nu”, meaning “the grandpa buddha has eaten”. The tiger is respected as the king of the jungle and considered a precious animal, elevating it to the level of an awakened being.

Palden Lhendup from Nubi counts the number of cattle he has lost to tigers over the years, and it outnumbers his fingers: “Dungkar, Louchu, Shamkhar, Dzongsar, Tshechi, Machu…”

He fondly remembers his beloved bull, Jatsha Dungkar. Dungkar would guard smaller members of the herd from tigers until he lost his own life doing so.

When Pema Lhamo became mangmi in 2017, she faced the daunting task of addressing the villagers’ grievances without adequate compensation or budgetary support.

“With the support now, I can confidently advocate for the conservation of tigers to my people and relevant authorities,” she said.

The villagers said the government’s withdrawal of compensation and tougher penalties for killing tigers left them uncertain about the best course of action.

“However, the institution of Gewog Tiger Conservation Tshogpa (GTCT) provides consolation money and various government and international projects in the tiger landscapes has given us some hope to live in harmony with the tigers,” Palden Lhendup said.

In her speech, Pema Lhamo said, “Continued support is needed to sustain the tiger population. Providing five power tillers for five chiwogs, consolation money, electric fencing, and community grazing in the villages has proven successful.”

After implementing community grazing established through UNEP’s Vanishing Treasures Programme  with electric fencing in two villages, Semji and Jongthang, villagers have seen fewer tiger attacks on livestock.

The  project helps protect tigers and livelihoods in two areas in Trongsa and Trashigang.

In Bumthang, tiger encounters are frequent, especially in lower Chumey, prompting villagers to keep livestock near home. Despite efforts, tiger attacks persist, with ten cattle harmed since implementing GTCT.

Langthel Gewog in Trongsa has reported no attacks since GTCT. Tshogpa Sonam attributes this to offerings the villagers made to the local deity, the Black Mountain, who protects their cattle.

Problem bigger than tigers

In her speech, Pema Lhamo identified Nubi Gewog as a hotspot for human-wildlife conflict due to its proximity to protected areas. The gewog is surrounded by Wangchuck Centennial Park and Jigme Singye Wangchuck National Park, both known for their healthy tiger populations, and a biological corridor running through it.

According to the Nature Conservation Division, in 2018, there were 5,300 households within the national parks, with additional 1,600 households located within 500 metres of the parks. About 3,400 households fall within the biological corridors, with about 2,700 households located within 500 metres of these corridors.

A National Land Commission Secretariat official said there was no clear definition of protected areas and emphasised the need for one. This would stipulate where human settlements could be allowed and the kinds of activities permissible within protected areas.

Villagers like Tshering Dema highlight the daily struggle of living near protected areas, including conflicts with tigers and other wild animals. They share concerns over prey availability in the forest, particularly because tigers seem to hone their hunting skills on domestic animals.

“Human-tiger conflicts arise from shared landscapes, resource competition, habitat disturbance, and dwindling prey,” Head of the Bhutan Tiger Centre, Tashi Dhendup said. “Lower altitudes rich in prey like gaur and sambar can support larger tiger populations. For example, Royal Manas National Park in the south sustains between two and three tigers per 100km².”

Studies reveal a lower presence of ungulates in higher altitudes, which impacts tiger’s sustenance. The thriving population of tigers in Trongsa is attributed to their dependence on livestock.

“The forest’s carrying capacity for tigers remains unknown but Bhutan’s forests feature well-connected habitats with forest covers, crucial for providing safe homes for tigers,” Tashi Dhendup said. “The Department of Forests and Park Services ensures habitat protection which enhances safety.”

The villagers express a strong desire for measures to protect their livelihoods as they lived in the area long before it was designated as protected.

In her closing remarks at the STFL conference, Pema Lhamo emphasised her responsibility to address the challenges her community faced.

She advocated for support to implement mitigation programmes and enhance livelihood opportunities, aiming to foster a balanced ecosystem where tigers and humans can coexist.

This story was supported through a grant from GRID-Arendal and the Vanishing Treasures

Programme

 

On tax reforms

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 14:00

Following  the revision in property tax where property owners, for the first time, are made to pay tax in proportion to their income, taxation policy in the country has become the topic for discourse even if it is mostly about  why an outgoing government took  such an “unpopular”  decision.

Taxes are important even if they are not seen as the source of government revenue. Like the Resident representative of UNDP, Mohammad Younus said, it is a profound social contact between citizens and the state. Progressive tax system is a proven taxation policy or even an economic tool to bolster economic growth while ensuring equality and fairness in the society.

If our current tax policy  relied  on assumptions, incentives, and deductions, it is a flawed policy. And if the Income Tax Act 2001 has become outdated and fails to accommodate the changing landscape of digital assets, cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, and blockchain technology, it is not a fair taxation system.

There is a national dialogue on tax justice, enhanced compliance, and a renewed social contract happening. The timing is good. Notwithstanding the silent complaints, property owners are complying with the revised tax laws. We can surmise the revenue from taxes will help in improved domestic revenue. To put into context, a 13-decimal landowner in Semtokha is paying four times the amount she paid last year.

Critics say Bhutan’s taxation policy is rich centric. Economists are already concerned about the dwindling revenue from the various tax reforms in the recent past.  If Bhutan’s tax base was already narrow, the increasing amount of revenue foregone through incentives is eroding the tax base and creating considerable challenge in mobilising domestic revenue.

Domestic revenue collection is receiving growing attention in recent years. For instance, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the World Bank and many more are calling for more determined action to combat tax evasion and avoidance. Developing countries are urged to increase their own tax collection.

The more important reason, close to Bhutanese is the rising inequalities. There are many factors leading to the growing inequalities in a nation striving for “a just and harmonious society.” Taxation is one. Experts have estimated that the inequality is so stark that one Bhutanese in the mining sector is earning as much as 10,000 other Bhutanese.

The salaried group is wondering why they pay income tax when the proprietor of rich luxury hotels, started with the grandest proposal, are coming in their flashy Prados to declare their loss, year after year. If our tax base is narrow, we  grant tax holidays and concessions to already rich businesses and companies.

How we ensure that every Bhutanese enjoys the fruits of progress can be only addressed through policy intervention. With Bhutan graduating from the category of least developed countries, observers are pointing out that the government should start imposing new taxes like wealth tax, inheritance tax or even capital gains tax.

The revised property tax has left a dent on the income of property owners, but there is no outcry. They know the government needs revenue to fund development activities. In the capital city, thousands of property owners are expecting improved services like proper roads, drainage system, streetlights, parks and reliable drinking water. Some are even bullying the Thrompon demanding services after they had paid their  revised taxes.

The Thrompon’s hands are tied. The revenue goes to the government coffer and he depends on the government. As we start a dialogue on tax justices, it would be right to discuss if thromdes should keep a good share of the revenue collected to be invested back for the residents and property owners.

Agriculture sector to allow 100 percent FDI

Thu, 05/16/2024 - 13:59

YK Poudel  

The government has declared 100 percent foreign direct investment (FDI) in the agriculture sector.

Full FDI in the sector aims to boost the production of six key commodities, namely mandarin, quinoa, rainbow trout, black pepper, asparagus, and strawberry.

This is a significant increase from the previous limit of 74 percent FDI.

The announcement was made yesterday at the inaugural session of Bhutan Agrifood Trade and Investment Forum (BATIF) 2024.

At the event, Lyonchhen Tshering Tobgay said that Bhutan must invest in modern technologies and adopt climate-smart approaches to enhance agriculture in Bhutan.

“Rugged terrain, climate change, human-wildlife conflict, shortage of farm labour and land fragmentation pose farming challenges. Yet, opportunities are equally compelling,” he said.

Lyonchhen underlined the feasibility of growing organic apples in Bhutan, developing a feasible market, and exportingthem to support smallholder farmers and entrepreneurs.

Minister of Agriculture and Livestock, Younten Phuntsho, emphasised the importance of embracing innovation, technology, and sustainable practices to achieve Bhutan’s vision of a modern, efficient, and market-oriented agri-food system.

“Most importantly, we need to harness the power of collective effort and collaboration,” he said.

Bhutan, lyonpo said, had the potential to reshape and transform its agri-food system, contributing not only to the nation’s food and nutrition security, but also to global efforts towards sustainability.

In the policy context, lyonpo said that Bhutan’s agrifood system was underpinned by a robust macro-policy framework, driving sustainable agriculture, food security, and economic prosperity.

Key policy documents, such as the Food and Nutrition Security, National Food System Pathways, and Low Emissions Development Strategy guide the efforts to enhance resilience and sustainability, all within the broad framework of GNH.

Industry Minister Namgyal Dorji stressed that investments in agriculture should empower farmers. He said that Bhutan already hosts several foreign investors, emphasising the potential for further collaboration to benefit farmers.

“The government will allow the employment of foreign expatriates in Bhutan without restrictions,” lyonpo said.

Today, there are approximately 8,000 smallholder farmers in the country. Lyonpo emphasised the importance of supporting them to achieve innovative, resilient, and sustainable outcomes in agriculture.

The contribution of RNR, the primary sector, to GDP, steadily declined from 38 percent in 1992 to 14.67 percent in 2022.

The sector employs 43.5 percent of the population in 2.75 percent of arable land.

 

Key focus

Bhutan aims to increase the agriculture sector’s contribution to GDP from USD 365 million in 2022 to USD 625 million by 2029, and USD 854 million by 2034.

Citrus production, for example, is expected to engage 5,000 households across 16 dzongkhags, resulting in an annual production of 28,800 metric tonnes (MT).

Quinoa cultivation is feasible in seven dzongkhags, with a target production of 2,360 MT a year, which can benefit 4,000 households.

Rainbow trout production is planned on 13 farms in three dzongkhags, with an annual production target of 72 MT.

Black pepper cultivation is feasible in five dzongkhags, and is expected to benefit 3,000 households.

Asparagus cultivation, planned in two dzongkhags, has the potential for 700 to 900 MT a year, engaging 2,000 households.

Strawberry cultivation is feasible in two dzongkhags and has the potential to benefit 500 farms with a production of 360 MT a year.

 

BATIF 2024

Six new products, namely mushroom tea, organic green and black tea, vermicompost, aiga processed cheese block, agarwood chips and oil, coffee plants sapling, and cherries collection were launched yesterday at the event.

Happening between May 15 and 19, the BATIF provides a platform for policymakers, entrepreneurs, and businesses to present investment opportunities to a wide audience, including foreign investors, multilateral development banks, and the private sector.

The event is organised by the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock in collaboration with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Employment, the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the UN, the European Union, the Bhutan Chamber of Commerce and Industry, and various government agencies.

འབྲུག་གི་དཔལ་འབྱོར་ཡར་འཕར་དོན་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་གཞི་སྒྱུར་གལ་ཅན།

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 16:17

༉ ཚོད་རྩིས་བཏོན་པའི་ ནང་འཁོད་འོང་འབབ་བརྒྱ་ཆ་༧.༡ དེ་ཅིག་ ཡར་འཕར་སོང་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ རྩིས་ལོ་༢༠༢༣-༢༤ ལུ་ རྩིས་ཆད་དངུལ་ཀྲམ་ཐེར་འབུམ་༡༥.༥༥ དམིགས་གཏད་བསྐྱེད་མི་གིས་ ཁྱད་པར་བསུབ་ནི་ལུ་ ལྷན་ཐབས་འབད་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་སྲིད་བྱུས་དང་ ཁྲལ་བདག་སྐྱོང་ལམ་ལུགས་ དེ་ལས་ བརྡ་དོན་འཕྲུལ་རིག་གི་ གཞི་རྟེན་དང་འབྲེལ་བའི་ དཀའ་ངལ་ཚུ་ སྦོམ་སྦེ་ར་ བྱུང་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

གནད་དོན་འདི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ ཕན་ནུས་ཅན་གྱི་ ཁྲལ་ལམ་ལུགས་གཞི་བཙུགས་འབད་ནི་དང་ མི་ཚུ་གི་དོན་ལས་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་ཞབས་ཏོག་ཚུ་ ཡར་དྲག་གཏང་ནི་ལུ་ དཀའ་ངལ་བྱུང་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

འོང་འབབ་དང་ཅ་དམ་ལས་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ ཐོ་བཀོད་དང་འཁྲིལ་བ་ཅིན་ འབྲུག་ལུ་ ལས་འཛིན་དང་ ཚོང་འབྲེལ་ རང་སོའི་འབབ་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ཁྲལ་བཏབ་མི་༡༡༦,༠༠༠ དེ་ཅིག་ ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རང་སོའི་ འབབ་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ཁྲལ་བཏབ་མི་དང་ ནང་འཁོན་ཐོན་སྐྱེད་ཡོངས་འབོར་གྱི་ཆ་ཚད་ བརྒྱ་ཆ་༡༣ དེ་ཅིག་ ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ལས་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ ཡོངས་ཁྱབ་མདོ་ཆེན་ བསོད་ནམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ འབྲུག་གི་ འབབ་ཁུངས་ཁྲལ་གྱི་སྲིད་བྱུས་དེ་ འགན་ལེན་དང་ སེམས་ཤུགས་མཐུན་རྐྱེན་ དེ་ལས་ ཕབ་ཆག་ལུ་བརྟེན་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ རང་སོའི་ འབབ་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ཁྲལ་བཅའ་ཁྲིམས་༢༠༠༡ ཅན་མ་དེ་ དུས་ཚོད་རྫོགས་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ ལམ་ལུགས་བསྒྱུར་བཅོས་འགྱོ་མི་དང་འབྲེལ་ ཌི་ཇི་ཊཱལ་དང་ ཀི་རིབ་ཊོ་ ཀ་རེན་སིསི་ བིཊ་ཀོའི་དང་ ལོ་བོག་ཅེན་འཕྲུལ་རིག་ཚུ་དང་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་ཚུགས་པས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཡོངས་ཁྱབ་མདོ་ཆེན་གྱིས་ གནད་དོན་ཚུ་ཡང སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༡༣ ལུ་ སྤ་རོ་ འཇིགས་མེད་སེངྒེ་དབང་ཕྱུག་ཁྲིམས་ཀྱི་སློབ་སྡེ་ནང་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོ་འཕེལ་གྱི་དམིགས་ཡུལ་གྲུབ་ནི་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་དྲང་བདེན་དང་ ཁྲིམས་ལུགས་གནས་ནི་ལུ་ལྷན་ཐབས་ དེ་ལས་ མི་སྡེ་གན་ཡིག་བསྐྱར་གསོ་གི་ རྒྱལ་ཡོངས་གྲོས་འཛོམས་འཚོགས་པའི་སྐབས་ བཤད་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ད་རེས་ འབྲུག་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་བཏབ་མི་མཐོ་ཤོས་བརྒྱ་ཆ་༢༠ གིས་ ཁྲལ་འོང་འབབ་ཡོངས་བསྡོམས་ལས་ བརྒྱ་ཆ་༨༠ ལྷན་ཐབས་འབད་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ད་ བསོད་ནམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ གནས་སྟངས་དེ་ ལོག་དབྱེ་ཞིབ་འབད་དགོཔ་ཡོད་མི་དེ་ཡང་ ད་ལྟོ་ཚུན་ རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་ ག་ར་གིས་ གཅིག་མཚུངས་སྦེ་ ཁྲལ་བཏབ་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ཨིན་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ མི་སེར་ཚུ་གིས་ ཁྲལ་དང་འབྲེལ་བའི་ སྟབས་མ་བདེཝ་ཚུ་ སེལ་ཐབས་ལུ་ ཁྲབ་བཏབ་དོ་ཡོད་རུང་ ཡོངས་འབྲེལ་གྱི་ ལམ་ལུགས་དེ་ ཕན་ནུས་ཅན་ཅིག་མེདཔ་ད་ རང་སོའི་འབབ་ཁུངས་ཀྱི་ ཁྲལ་བཏབ་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ ར་མིསི་ལམ་ལུགས་རྙིངམ་དེ་ར་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ ཕན་ནུས་ཅན་ཅིག་ མིན་འདུག་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ལས་ཁུངས་ཀྱིས་ ནང་འདྲེན་དང་ ཕྱིར་ཚོང་བྱ་སྒོ་གྱི་ ལམ་ལུགས་ཡར་དྲག་གཏང་ནིའི་དོན་ལས་ ཡོངས་འབྲེལ་ཐོག་ལས་ འོང་འབབ་འཛིན་སྐྱོང་ལམ་ལུགས་ཅིག་ བཟོ་ཡོདཔ་ད་ དེང་སང་ལམ་ལུགས་དང་ འབྲེལ་བ་བཟོ་ནིའི་དོན་ལས་ འོང་འབབ་ཁྲལ་གྱི་བཅའ་ཁྲིམས་ཡང་ བསྐྱར་ཞིབ་འབད་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

བསོད་ནམས་རྒྱ་མཚོ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ ལམ་ལུགས་ཀྱི་ དམིགས་ཡུལ་དེ་ཡང་ བྱ་སྒོའི་ལམ་ལུགས་དང་ སྒྲིག་གཞི་ དེ་ལས་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་ལམ་ལུགས་ཚུ་ སྟབས་བདེ་ཏོག་ཏོ་ བཟོ་ནི་ལུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་ཨིན་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཁྲལ་གྱི་འགོ་དཔོན་ཚུ་གི་ ལཱ་མར་ཕབ་ལུ་ ལས་ཁུངས་ཀྱིས་ ཌ་ཊ་བཙུགས་མི་དང་འབྲེལ་ ལཱ་ཚུ་འབད་ནིའི་ལུ་ ཁ་སྐོང་ལས་བྱེདཔ་ཚུ་ གསར་བཙུགས་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

 

ཁྲལ་དང་ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་ དམིགས་ཡུལ་ཚུ།

སྤྱི་ལོ་༢༠༣༠ གི་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྲོས་གཞི་འོག་ལུ་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་དམིགས་ཡུལ་༡༧ འགྲུབ་ནི་དེ་ དངུལ་འབྲེལ་སྒྲིང་སྒྲི་དགོཔ་དེ་ གལ་ཅན་སྦེ་ མཐོང་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་ དངུལ་འབྲུལ་དང་འབྲེལ་བའི་ ཁྱད་ཆོས་ཡར་དྲག་གཏང་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་ལམ་ལུགས་ལེགས་ཤོམ་བཟོ་ནི་དེ་ ཆ་ཤས་གཙོ་ཅན་ཅིག་ཨིན་པས།

འཛམ་གླིང་སྤྱི་ཚོགས་གོང་འཕེལ་ལས་རིམ་གྱི་ གནས་བཞུགས་ངོ་ཚབ་ མ་ཧ་མཌི་ ཡོ་ནུསི་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ ཁྲལ་དེ་ འོང་འབབ་བསྡུ་ལེན་འབད་ནི་རྐྱངམ་གཅིག་མེན་པར་ མི་སེར་དང་ གཞུང་གི་བར་ན་ མི་སྡེའི་འགན་ཡིག་ཅིག་ཡང་ ཨིན་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ དྲང་མཉམ་དང་ ཁྲལ་ལམ་ལུགས་ལེགས་ཤོམ་གྱིས་ དཔལ་འབྱོར་གོང་འཕེལ་གཏང་ནི་གིས་མ་ཚད་པར་ མི་སྡེ་གཅིག་མཐུན་དང་ གཞུང་སྐྱོང་ལེགས་ལྡན་ རང་བཞིན་གནས་སྟངས་ཡུན་བརྟན་ལ་སོགས་པ་ཚུ་ གོང་འཕེལ་གཏང་ནི་ལུ་ ལྷན་ཐབས་འབད་ཚུགས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཨེ་ཤི་ཡ་དང་ པེ་སི་ཕིཊ་ལུང་ཕྱོགས་ཀྱི་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་ དམིགས་ཡུལ་འགྲུབ་ཚུགས་ག?

མ་ཧ་མཌི་ ཡོ་ནུསི་གིས་ ཨེ་ཤི་ཡ་དང་ པེ་སི་ཕིཊ་གི་ རྒྱལ་སྤྱི་དཔལ་འབྱོར་དང་མི་སྡེ་ལྷན་ཚོགས་ཀྱི ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་ གྲུབ་འབྲས་སྙན་ཞུ་སྐོར་ལས་ སྙན་ཞུ་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ལུང་ཕྱོགས་ཀྱིས་ སྤྱི་ལོ་༢༠༣༠ ལུ་ དཔྱ་༣ རྐྱངམ་གཅིག་ འགྲུབ་ཚུགས་ནི་བཟུམ་ཅིག་ཡོད་པའི་ཁར་ ངོས་ལེན་འབད་བའི་ དུས་ཚོད་ནང་འཁོད་ལུ་ དམིགས་ཡུལ་༧༠ ཡང་ འགྲུབ་ཚུགས་པར་ ལཱ་ཁག་གཏང་ནི་མས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ཨེ་ཤི་ཡ་པེ་སི་ཕིག་ལུང་ཕྱོགས་ནང་ ཕན་ནུས་ཅན་གྱི་ ཁྲལ་གཞི་སྒྱུར་གྱིས་ ལོག་དཔལ་འབྱོར་གོང་འཕེལ་གཏང་ནི་ལུ་ འོས་འབབ་སྦོམ་ཡོདཔ་ད་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་ དམིགས་ཡུལ་འགྲུབ་ནི་ལུ་ དངུལ་འབྲེལ་གྱི་ཐོན་སྐྱེད་ལེ་ཤ་ དགོས་མཁོ་ཡོདཔ་བཞིན་དུ་ ཡུ་ཨེསི་ཌི་དུང་ཕྱུར་༤.༢ གི་ ཁྱད་པར་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

མ་ཧ་མཱད་ ཡོ་ནུསི་གིས་ རྒྱལ་སྤྱི་གོང་འཕེལ་ལས་རིམ་གྱིས་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་དམིགས་ཡུལ་ལས་འགུལ་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་འགོ་དཔོན་ཚུ་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་རྩིས་བསྡུ་ལེན་དང་ ཁྲལ་བདེ་སྒྲིག་གན་ཡིག་ དེ་ལས་ འབྲུག་གི་དམིགས་སེལ་ཐབས་ནང་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་གན་ཡིག་བརྩིས་ཏེ་ འབྲུག་ལུ་ དགོས་མཁོ་ཅན་གྱི་ རྒྱབ་སྐྱོར་ཚུ་ བྱིན་དོ་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཁོ་གིས་ འཕྲལ་ར་ འགོ་འདྲེན་འཐབ་ནི་ཨིན་མི་ལས་སྣ་ ཁྲལ་གྱི་གནས་ཚད་དང་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་དམིགས་ཡུལ་སྐོར་ལས་ སྦྱོང་བརྡར་དང་ སྤྱི་ཚོགས་ཀྱི་འཐུས་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ ཁྲལ་དང་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་དམིགས་ཡུལ་བར་ན་ འབྲེལ་མཐུད་ཀྱི་ གྲོས་འཛོམས་སྐོར་ལས་ གསལ་བསྒྲགས་འབད་ཡོད་པའི་གནས་ཚུལ།

 

ཨོ་རྒྱན་རྡོ་རྗེ།

 

སྤ་རོ་བོང་སྡེ་ལུ་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ལྗགས་ལུང་ སྤྱི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལས་ འགོ་བཙུགས་ནི།

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 15:52

༉ སྤ་རོ་བོང་སྡེ་སྟོད་ལུ་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིའི་ ས་ཁོངས་ནང་ ཟླ་ངོ་ཕྱེད་དང་བཞི་གི་རིང་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ དབང་ལུང་ཁྲིད་གསུམ་གནང་པའི་སྐབས་ རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་འཁོད་ཀྱི་ དད་ཅན་སྐྱ་སེར་ཕོ་མོ་སྟོང་ཕྲག་ལས་བཅད་དེ་ གྲལ་གཏོགས་འབད་ནི་གི་ རེ་བ་ཡོད་ཟེར་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པ་གིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཡང་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རབ་འབྱམས་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ རང་ཟླ་༤ པའི་ཚེས་༢༡ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལས་འགོ་བཙུགས་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༩ པའི་ཚེས་༡༣ ཚུན་ གནང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ད་ བཀའ་དབང་ལས་རིམ་དེ་

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་ དབུ་གཙོས་ཏེ་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ འགོ་འདྲེན་འཐབ་ཨིན་པས།

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་ བཤད་མིའི་ནང་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དང་ མཁན་པོ་ དགེ་སློང་ ཨ་ནེམོ་ སྒོམ་ཆེན་ དེ་ལས་ སྤྱིར་བཏང་དད་ཅན་༡༠,༠༠༠ ལྷགཔ་ཅིག་ འཛོམས་ནི་གི་ རེ་བ་ཡོད་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པའི་ཧོངས་ལས་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ལྷ་ཁང་གི་ གདོང་ཕྱོགས་ལུ་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་༡༢,༠༠༠ དེ་ཅིག་ ཤོང་ཚུགས་པའི་ དབང་ཁང་ངམ་ ཚོགས་ཁང་ཆེན་མོ་ཅིག་ བཟོ་སྐྲུན་འབད་བའི་བསྒང་ཡོད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ གསལ་བསྒྲགས་འབད་མིའི་ནང་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རབ་འབྱམས་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཆེན་མོའི་ སྨིན་བྱེད་ཀྱི་ བཀའ་དབང་གནང་པའི་སྐབས་ བྱ་བ་ཐ་དག་འབད་མེད་ལྷུན་གྱིས་འགྲུབ་ནི་དང་ ཕྱི་ནང་གསང་གསུམ་གྱི་ སྐུ་བགེགས་ཞི་ནིའི་ ཞབས་བརྟན་ལུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༣ ལས་འགོ་བཙུགས་ སྤྱི་ཚེས་༢༦ ཚུན་ ཉིན་གྲངས་༤ གི་རིང་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིའི་ མཁན་སྤྲུལ་བླ་སློབ་འདུས་ཚོགས་དང་ ཞེ་ཆེན་དགོན་གྱི་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དགེ་འདུན་པ་ཚུ་གིས་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིཡི་ ཚོགས་ཁང་ཆེན་མོའི་ནང་ བླ་མ་ནང་སྒྲུབ་རིག་འཛིན་འདུས་པའི་ དཀྱིལ་འཁོར་ཞལ་ཕྱེས་ཏེ་ ཚོགས་ཀྱི་མཆོད་པ་འབུམ་ཐེར་ཕུལ་ནི་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༨ ལུ་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་གྲྭ་ཚང་ནང་ ཕེབས་གནང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ད་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལུ་ སྨིན་གླིང་རྡོར་སེམས་ཀྱི་ དཀྱིལ་འཁོར་ཞལ་ཕྱེས་ཏེ་ ས་ཆོག་དང་འབྲེལ་ རྡོར་སེམས་སྒྲུབ་མཆོད་དངོས་གཞི་འགོ་བཙུགས་ཞིནམ་ལས་ དབང་ལུང་མཇུག་མ་བསྡུའི་རིང་ལུ་ དུས་རྒྱུན་དུ་ འཚོགས་གནང་འོང་ཟེར་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པ་གིས་ གསལ་བསྒྲགས་འབདཝ་ཨིན་པས།

ལས་རིམ་དང་འཁྲིལ་བ་ཅིན་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༣༠ དྲོ་པ་ཆུ་ཚོད་༧ ལས་ ཨ་འཛོམ་རྒྱལ་སྲས་འགྱུར་མེད་རྡོ་རྗེ་མཆོག་སྤྲུལ་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་གིས་ གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་གནང་ནི་དང་ ཉིན་མའི་ཆུ་ཚོད་༡ ལུ་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ བཀའ་དབང་བསྩལ་གནང་ནི་ཨིན་པས།

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པའི་ཧོངས་ལས་ གསོལ་ཚོགས་དང་ གསོལ་ཇ་དྲང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ལས་ དད་ཅན་ཚུ་གིས་ བཞེས་རས་བཞེས་ཆ་ཚུ་ བསྣམས་འབྱོན་གནང་ཟེར་ ཞུ་བ་འབདཝ་ཨིན་པས།

ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་བདེ་སྒྲིག།

ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་གི་ ཕན་ཐབས་ལུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་ སྒེར་གྱི་ས་ཆ་ཨེ་ཀར་༡ ལེན་ཞིནམ་ལས་ ཕོ་སྐྱེས་ཀྱི་གསང་སྤྱོད་༦༤ དང་ ཨམ་སྲུའི་གསང་སྤྱོད་༥༦ ས་དོང་བརྐོ་ཐོག་ལས་ ཁང་ཚན་སྦེ་ བཟོ་སྟེ་ཡོད་པའི་ཁར་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དང་ དགེ་སློང་ཚུ་གི་དོན་ལུ་ གྲྭ་ཤག་ནང་ན་ དེང་སང་གི་ གསང་སྤྱོད་༦༠ དེ་ཅིག་ ཡོདཔ་་ཨིན་པས།

ད་རུང་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ ཆུ་འཐུང་ནི་དང་ ལགཔ་འཁྱུ་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ དབང་ཁང་གི་ གཡས་གཡོན་ལུ་ ཆུ་ཏོག་ཀ་ལི་༦༠ དེ་ཅིག་ གཞི་བཙུགས་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ད་ མཁའ་སྤྲུལ་གྱིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ལས་རིམ་དེ་ གནམ་བྱཱར་གྱི་ ཆར་ཆུའི་དུས་ཚོད་ལུ་ཕོགཔ་ལས་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་གི་ གཟུགས་ཁམས་འཕྲོད་བསྟེན་ ལེགས་ལྡན་དང་ གཙང་སྦྲ་བསྟེན་དགོཔ་ གལ་ཆེ་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ གསང་སྤྱོད་དང་ འཐུང་ཆུའི་མཐུན་རྐྱེན་ཚུ་ མ་བཏུབ་བཏུབ་སྦེ་ གཞི་བཙུགས་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ དད་ཅན་ཚུ་ ཐུགས་ཚ་གྱང་བཞེས་མི་དགོ་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་འབདཝ་ད་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ སྡོད་ཁྱིམ་མ་ཐོབ་པའི་ གདོང་ལེན་ཡོད་མི་དེ་ཡང་ ད་རེས་ བོང་སྡེ་ཁྲོམ་དང་ ཉེ་འདབས་ཀྱི་ གཡུས་ཚན་ནང་ ཁང་ཚན་དང་ ཁྱིམ་ཚུ་ ཟླཝ་༣ དང་༤ གི་ཧེ་མ་ལས་ གླ་ཁར་བཏང་ཚར་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁང་གླར་ལེན་མི་ཅིག་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ སྤ་རོ་ལུ་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་གནང་ནི་ཨིན་པའི་ གནས་ཚུལ་གོ་བའི་ཤུལ་ལས་ ཐག་རིང་གི་རྫོང་ཁག་ མོང་སྒར་དང་ བཀྲིས་སྒང་ལས་ ཆོས་ཞུ་འདོད་ཡོད་མི་ དག་པ་ཅིག་གིས་ དུས་ཅི་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༡ པའི་ནང་ བོང་སྡེ་ཁྲོམ་དང་ མཐའ་འཁོར་གྱི་ གཡུས་ཚན་ཚུ་ནང་ ཁང་ཚན་ཚུ་འཚོལ་ཏེ་ བཞག་ནུག་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

སྡོད་ཁྱིམ་གྱི་ མཁོ་འདོད་བཀོད་མི་ མངམ་ཐོན་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ ཁྱིམ་དང་སའི་ཇོ་བདག་ཚུ་གིས་ཡང་ གོ་སྐབས་ལེན་ཐོག་ལས་ ཁང་གླ་མཐོ་དྲགས་སྦེ་ རྐྱབ་མི་དེ་ཡང་ མི་༣ དང་༤ ཤོང་ཚུགས་པའི་ ཁང་མིག་ཆུང་ཀུ་ཅིག་ལུ་ ཟླ་རིམ་ཁང་གླ་དངུལ་ཀྲམ་༡༥,༠༠༠ ལས་༢༠,༠༠༠ གི་བར་ན་ སླབ་མས་ཟེར་ ཁྱིམ་འཚོལ་མི་གིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་ལས་ གུར་སྤུབས་ཏེ་ སྡོད་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ ས་ཌིསི་རེ་ལུ་ གླར་སྤྱོད་ཀྱི་འཐུས་ ཟླཝ་༡ ནང་ དངུལ་ཀྲམ་༦,༠༠༠ རེ་ ལེན་དོ་ཡོད་པའི་གནས་ཚུལ།

གནས་ཚུལ་ལྷན་ཐབས་

རིག་འཛིན་དབང་ཕྱུག།

དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་གི་འཁོར་ལམ་ ཧོ་ཀ་མེད་པའི་ཁར་ སྤུས་ལྡན་བཟོ་དོ་ཡོདཔ།

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 15:49

༉ དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་ཁྲོམ་སྡེ་གིས་ མི་མང་ཉེན་སྲུང་དང་ ཡུན་བརྟན་གོང་འཕེལ་གྱི་དོན་ལུ་ འཁོར་ལམ་ཚུ་ ཧོ་ཀ་མེདཔ་སྦེ་ བཟོ་ནིའི་གདམ་ཁ་ རྐྱབ་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ད་ལྟོ་ལཱ་འབད་བའི་བསྒང་ཡོད་མི་ འཁོར་ལམ་རྩི་ནག་ ཁ་སྐོང་བཏང་ནི་དང་ ལམ་ཧོ་ཀ་ཡོད་མི་ཚུ་ བསུབ་ནིའི་ལཱ་འགོ་བཙུགས་ཏེ་ ཟླཝ་༡ ལང་ཡོདཔ་ད་ ལཱ་ཚུ་སྤྱི་ཟླ་༦ པའི་ཟླ་མཇུག་ལུ་ མཇུག་བསྡུ་ཚུགས་པའི་ རེ་བ་ཡོད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

གཞུང་གིས་ ལམ་གྱི་སྤུས་ཚད་ལེགས་སྒྱུར་དང་ སྣུམ་འཁོར་བྲེལ་ཟིང་མར་ཕབ་འབད་ཐབས་ལུ་ ལས་འགུལ་ནང་ ཟད་འགྲོ་དངུལ་ཀྲམ་ས་ཡ་༥༡.༣༥ བཞག་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁྲོམ་དཔོན་ཚེ་རིང་ནོར་བུ་གིས་ བཤད་མིའི་ནང་ སྒྲིང་ཁྱིམ་རྐྱབ་སར་ བཟོ་སྐྲུན་གྱི་རྒྱུ་ཆས་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་དང་ འཁོར་ལམ་གྱི་ལཱ་ཚུ་ འབད་ཡོད་མི་དེ་ཡང་ སྤྱི་ལོ་༢༠༢༣ གྱི་ སྒྲིང་ཁྱིམ་དང་ འཁོར་ལམ་ལཱ་གི་ དབྱེ་ཁག་ཐོག་ལུ་ ཆ་མཐུན་འབད་ཚུགས་པའི་ གནད་དོན་ཅིག་ཨིན་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

བཟོ་རིག་འགོ་དཔོན་གྱིས་ འཁོར་ལམ་བཟོ་སྐྲུན་ནང་ རྒྱུ་ཆས་ཚང་སྒྲིག་དང་ གཞི་འགྱམ་ཚུ་ག་ར་ བརྟག་ཞིབ་ལེགས་ཤོམ་འབད་དེ་ འཁོར་ལམ་དེ་ སྤུས་ཚད་ཅན་དང་ ཡུན་ཐུབ་ཀྱི་གནས་ཚད་དང་ལྡནམ་སྦེ་ འབད་ནི་ལུ་ རྩ་འགེངས་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁྲོམ་སྡེ་གིས་ དེང་སང་གི་ ཐབས་བྱུས་ཐོག་ལུ་བཟོ་མི་ འཁོར་ལམ་རྒྱུ་རྫས་སླ་བསྲེ་ཡོད་མི་ཚུ་ ཐད་ཀར་དུ་ བློ་གཏད་ཅན་གྱི་ བཟོ་གྲྭ་ཁང་ནང་ལས་ མཁོ་སྒྲུབ་འབད་དེ་ བསྐྱར་བཟོ་འབད་སའི་ས་ཁོངས་ ཧོ་ཀ་ཐོན་ཡོད་མི་ཚུ་ནང་ ནམ་དགོཔ་ཅིག་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་དོ་ཡོདཔ་སྦེ་ཨིན་པས།

ཚེ་རིང་ནོར་བུ་གིས་ བཤད་མིའི་ནང་ ཐབས་བྱུས་གསརཔ་ཚུ་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་གི་ འཁོར་ལམ་ཚུ་ ཧོ་ཀ་མི་ཐོན་ནི་དང་ འཁོར་ལམ་གྱི་ གཞི་རྟེན་མཁོ་ཆས་ཀྱི་རིགས་ཚུ་ག་ར་ ལེགས་ཤོམ་འགྱོ་ཚུགས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

རྒྱུ་ཆས་འདི་ཚུ་ འཁོར་ལམ་ཧོག་ཀ་དུམ་གྲ་རེ་འཐོན་མི་ཚུ་ རྐྱངམ་གཅིག་ལུ་ ཕན་ཐོགས་འབྱུང་ནི་མེན་པར་ ཡུན་བརྟན་དང་ འཁོར་ལམ་ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་ཚུ་ བྲེལ་ཟིང་ལང་དགོཔ་མེད་པར་ དཀའ་ངལ་སེལ་ཚུགས་ནི་མས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

འཁོར་ལམ་གཞི་རྟེན་ལེགས་བཅོས་འབདཝ་དང་འབྲེལ་ དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་ཁྲོམ་སྡེ་གིས་ འཁོར་ལམ་སྤུས་ཚད་ལེགས་ལྡན་ཐོག་ བཟོ་སྐྲུན་འབད་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ད་ འཐུང་ཆུའི་ལས་འགུལ་ཚུ་ སྤུས་ཚད་ཡུན་ཐུབ་ཅན་གྱི་ ཐོག་ལུ་འབད་མི་གིས་ རྒྱལ་ཡོངས་ནང་ དར་ཁྱབ་སོང་ཡི་ཟེར་ ཁྲོམ་དཔོན་གྱིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁྲོམ་དཔོན་ཚེ་རིང་ནོར་བུ་གིས་ བཤད་མིའི་ནང་ དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་ཁྲོམ་དེ་ རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ཀྱི་ ཁྲོམ་གཞན་གྱི་དོན་ལུ་ དཔེ་བལྟ་བཏུབ་ཅིག་འབད་ནི་དང་ དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་གིས་ ཁྱད་འཕགས་ཅན་གྱི་ སྤུས་ལྡན་ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་པའི་ གནད་དོན་ལུ་ དོགས་པ་ཆགས་དགོཔ་མེད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

འཁོར་ལམ་གཞི་རྟེན་མཁོ་ཆས་ཀྱི་ སྤུས་ཚད་ལེགས་ལྡན་དང་ ཡུན་ཐུབ་ལུ་བརྟེན་ སྐྱེལ་འདྲེན་གྱི་སྐབས་ལུ་ ཁྲོམ་སྡེའི་ནང་འཁོད་ལུ་ ཕན་ནུས་ཅན་དང་ ཉེན་སྲུང་ཅན་སྦེ་ ཡོད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

དགེ་ལེགས་ཕུག་དེ་ ནང་འཁོད་དང་ རྒྱལ་སྤྱི་གཉིས་ཆ་རའི་ཁ་ཐུག་ལས་ གལ་གནད་ཆེ་བའི་ས་ཁོངས་ཅིག་ལུ་ འགྱུར་ཡི་ཟེར་ཨིནམ་ད་ འདི་བཟུམ་གྱི་ ལཱ་འབད་བརྩོན་བསྐྱེད་དེ་འབད་མི་གིས་ མི་སེར་དང་ འཁོར་ལམ་ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་གཉིས་ཆ་རལུ་ ཕན་ཐོགས་སྦོམ་ར་ཡོད་ཟེར་ རྣམ་རྒྱལ་གྱིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པའི་གནས་ཚུལ།

ཚེ་རིང་དབང་འདུས།

བོང་སྡེ་ལུ་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ལྕགས་ལུང་ སྤྱི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལས་ འགོ་བཙུགས་ནི།

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 10:29

༉ སྤ་རོ་བོང་སྡེ་སྟོད་ལུ་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིའི་ ས་ཁོངས་ནང་ ཟླ་ངོ་ཕྱེད་དང་བཞི་གི་རིང་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ དབང་ལུང་ཁྲིད་གསུམ་གནང་པའི་སྐབས་ རྒྱལ་ཁབ་ནང་འཁོད་ཀྱི་ དད་ཅན་སྐྱ་སེར་ཕོ་མོ་སྟོང་ཕྲག་ལས་བཅད་དེ་ གྲལ་གཏོགས་འབད་ནི་གི་ རེ་བ་ཡོད་ཟེར་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པ་གིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཡང་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རབ་འབྱམས་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ རང་ཟླ་༤ པའི་ཚེས་༢༡ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལས་འགོ་བཙུགས་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༩ པའི་ཚེས་༡༣ ཚུན་ གནང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ད་ བཀའ་དབང་ལས་རིམ་དེ་

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་ དབུ་གཙོས་ཏེ་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ འགོ་འདྲེན་འཐབ་ཨིན་པས།

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་ བཤད་མིའི་ནང་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དང་ མཁན་པོ་ དགེ་སློང་ ཨ་ནེམོ་ སྒོམ་ཆེན་ དེ་ལས་ སྤྱིར་བཏང་དད་ཅན་༡༠,༠༠༠ ལྷགཔ་ཅིག་ འཛོམས་ནི་གི་ རེ་བ་ཡོད་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པའི་ཧོངས་ལས་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ལྷ་ཁང་གི་ གདོང་ཕྱོགས་ལུ་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་༡༢,༠༠༠ དེ་ཅིག་ ཤོང་ཚུགས་པའི་ དབང་ཁང་ངམ་ ཚོགས་ཁང་ཆེན་མོ་ཅིག་ བཟོ་སྐྲུན་འབད་བའི་བསྒང་ཡོད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ གསལ་བསྒྲགས་འབད་མིའི་ནང་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རབ་འབྱམས་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཆེན་མོའི་ སྨིན་བྱེད་ཀྱི་ བཀའ་དབང་གནང་པའི་སྐབས་ བྱ་བ་ཐ་དག་འབད་མེད་ལྷུན་གྱིས་འགྲུབ་ནི་དང་ ཕྱི་ནང་གསང་གསུམ་གྱི་ སྐུ་བགེགས་ཞི་ནིའི་ ཞབས་བརྟན་ལུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༣ ལས་འགོ་བཙུགས་ སྤྱི་ཚེས་༢༦ ཚུན་ ཉིན་གྲངས་༤ གི་རིང་ ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིའི་ མཁན་སྤྲུལ་བླ་སློབ་འདུས་ཚོགས་དང་ ཞེ་ཆེན་དགོན་གྱི་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དགེ་འདུན་པ་ཚུ་གིས་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རིཡི་ ཚོགས་ཁང་ཆེན་མོའི་ནང་ བླ་མ་ནང་སྒྲུབ་རིག་འཛིན་འདུས་པའི་ དཀྱིལ་འཁོར་ཞལ་ཕྱེས་ཏེ་ ཚོགས་ཀྱི་མཆོད་པ་འབུམ་ཐེར་ཕུལ་ནི་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༨ ལུ་ ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་གྲྭ་ཚང་ནང་ ཕེབས་གནང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ད་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༢༩ ལུ་ སྨིན་གླིང་རྡོར་སེམས་ཀྱི་ དཀྱིལ་འཁོར་ཞལ་ཕྱེས་ཏེ་ ས་ཆོག་དང་འབྲེལ་ རྡོར་སེམས་སྒྲུབ་མཆོད་དངོས་གཞི་འགོ་བཙུགས་ཞིནམ་ལས་ དབང་ལུང་མཇུག་མ་བསྡུའི་རིང་ལུ་ དུས་རྒྱུན་དུ་ འཚོགས་གནང་འོང་ཟེར་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པ་གིས་ གསལ་བསྒྲགས་འབདཝ་ཨིན་པས།

ལས་རིམ་དང་འཁྲིལ་བ་ཅིན་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༣༠ དྲོ་པ་ཆུ་ཚོད་༧ ལས་ ཨ་འཛོམ་རྒྱལ་སྲས་འགྱུར་མེད་རྡོ་རྗེ་མཆོག་སྤྲུལ་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་གིས་ གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་གནང་ནི་དང་ ཉིན་མའི་ཆུ་ཚོད་༡ ལུ་ སྐྱབས་རྗེ་ཞེ་ཆེན་རིན་པོ་ཆེ་མཆོག་གིས་ བཀའ་དབང་བསྩལ་གནང་ནི་ཨིན་པས།

མཁན་སྤྲུལ་ཀརྨ་འཇིགས་མེད་ཀྱིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ འགོ་འདྲེན་པའི་ཧོངས་ལས་ གསོལ་ཚོགས་དང་ གསོལ་ཇ་དྲང་ནི་ཨིནམ་ལས་ དད་ཅན་ཚུ་གིས་ བཞེས་རས་བཞེས་ཆ་ཚུ་ བསྣམས་འབྱོན་གནང་ཟེར་ ཞུ་བ་འབདཝ་ཨིན་པས།

ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་བདེ་སྒྲིག།

ཨྱོན་པདྨ་ཟངས་མདོག་དཔལ་རི་ཆོས་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་གི་ ཕན་ཐབས་ལུ་དམིགས་ཏེ་ སྒེར་གྱི་ས་ཆ་ཨེ་ཀར་༡ ལེན་ཞིནམ་ལས་ ཕོ་སྐྱེས་ཀྱི་གསང་སྤྱོད་༦༤ དང་ ཨམ་སྲུའི་གསང་སྤྱོད་༥༦ ས་དོང་བརྐོ་ཐོག་ལས་ ཁང་ཚན་སྦེ་ བཟོ་སྟེ་ཡོད་པའི་ཁར་ བླ་སྤྲུལ་དང་ དགེ་སློང་ཚུ་གི་དོན་ལུ་ གྲྭ་ཤག་ནང་ན་ དེང་སང་གི་ གསང་སྤྱོད་༦༠ དེ་ཅིག་ ཡོདཔ་་ཨིན་པས།

ད་རུང་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ ཆུ་འཐུང་ནི་དང་ ལགཔ་འཁྱུ་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ དབང་ཁང་གི་ གཡས་གཡོན་ལུ་ ཆུ་ཏོག་ཀ་ལི་༦༠ དེ་ཅིག་ གཞི་བཙུགས་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ད་ མཁའ་སྤྲུལ་གྱིས་འབད་བ་ཅིན་ ལྗགས་ལུང་ལས་རིམ་དེ་ གནམ་བྱཱར་གྱི་ ཆར་ཆུའི་དུས་ཚོད་ལུ་ཕོགཔ་ལས་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་གི་ གཟུགས་ཁམས་འཕྲོད་བསྟེན་ ལེགས་ལྡན་དང་ གཙང་སྦྲ་བསྟེན་དགོཔ་ གལ་ཆེ་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ གསང་སྤྱོད་དང་ འཐུང་ཆུའི་མཐུན་རྐྱེན་ཚུ་ མ་བཏུབ་བཏུབ་སྦེ་ གཞི་བཙུགས་འབད་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ དད་ཅན་ཚུ་ ཐུགས་ཚ་གྱང་བཞེས་མི་དགོ་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་འབདཝ་ད་ ཆོས་ཞུ་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ སྡོད་ཁྱིམ་མ་ཐོབ་པའི་ གདོང་ལེན་ཡོད་མི་དེ་ཡང་ ད་རེས་ བོང་སྡེ་ཁྲོམ་དང་ ཉེ་འདབས་ཀྱི་ གཡུས་ཚན་ནང་ ཁང་ཚན་དང་ ཁྱིམ་ཚུ་ ཟླཝ་༣ དང་༤ གི་ཧེ་མ་ལས་ གླ་ཁར་བཏང་ཚར་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ཁང་གླར་ལེན་མི་ཅིག་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ སྤ་རོ་ལུ་ རིན་ཆེན་གཏེར་མཛོད་ཀྱི་ ལྗགས་ལུང་གནང་ནི་ཨིན་པའི་ གནས་ཚུལ་གོ་བའི་ཤུལ་ལས་ ཐག་རིང་གི་རྫོང་ཁག་ མོང་སྒར་དང་ བཀྲིས་སྒང་ལས་ ཆོས་ཞུ་འདོད་ཡོད་མི་ དག་པ་ཅིག་གིས་ དུས་ཅི་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༡ པའི་ནང་ བོང་སྡེ་ཁྲོམ་དང་ མཐའ་འཁོར་གྱི་ གཡུས་ཚན་ཚུ་ནང་ ཁང་ཚན་ཚུ་འཚོལ་ཏེ་ བཞག་ནུག་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

སྡོད་ཁྱིམ་གྱི་ མཁོ་འདོད་བཀོད་མི་ མངམ་ཐོན་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ ཁྱིམ་དང་སའི་ཇོ་བདག་ཚུ་གིས་ཡང་ གོ་སྐབས་ལེན་ཐོག་ལས་ ཁང་གླ་མཐོ་དྲགས་སྦེ་ རྐྱབ་མི་དེ་ཡང་ མི་༣ དང་༤ ཤོང་ཚུགས་པའི་ ཁང་མིག་ཆུང་ཀུ་ཅིག་ལུ་ ཟླ་རིམ་ཁང་གླ་དངུལ་ཀྲམ་༡༥,༠༠༠ ལས་༢༠,༠༠༠ གི་བར་ན་ སླབ་མས་ཟེར་ ཁྱིམ་འཚོལ་མི་གིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་ལས་ གུར་སྤུབས་ཏེ་ སྡོད་ནིའི་དོན་ལུ་ ས་ཌིསི་རེ་ལུ་ གླར་སྤྱོད་ཀྱི་འཐུས་ ཟླཝ་༡ ནང་ དངུལ་ཀྲམ་༦,༠༠༠ རེ་ ལེན་དོ་ཡོད་པའི་གནས་ཚུལ།

 

རིག་འཛིན་དབང་ཕྱུག།

Is tobacco smuggling thriving?

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:30

…import saw three-fold drop

Thukten Zangpo

In 2023, the import of tobacco and tobacco products decreased by three times, sparking worries about a potential increase in tobacco smuggling within the country.

According to data from the Department of Revenue and Customs, imports of tobacco and tobacco products decreased by more than 300 percent to Nu 542.33 million in 2023, down from Nu 1.59 billion in 2022. This decline coincides with the reintroduction of a 100 percent sales tax.

Tobacco was one of the top ten goods imported in 2022.

Bhutan lifted the ban on tobacco and tobacco products with the amendment of the Tax Act of Bhutan 2021, which came into force in July 2021 to curb the risks of Covid-19 transmission. There were then continuous tobacco smuggling incidents from across the border.

The government revised the sales tax from 100 percent to zero.

However, in November 2022, the government reinstated the 100 percent sales tax and increased customs duty on tobacco import by 10 percent under the Tax Act of Bhutan 2022.

The period of relaxed regulations saw a significant increase in imports, translating to more than Nu 1.59 billion as tax revenue in government coffers in 2002.

Conversely, tax revenue from tobacco imports was more than Nu 542 million tax revenue in 2023.

As per Section 63 of the Customs Act of Bhutan 2017, import and export goods, whether dutiable or exempted, should be declared to the department at the customs station and customs area. As per the Customs Rules and Regulations of Bhutan 2017, a person shall declare goods to customs at the point of entry or exit.

The Customs Act states: “A person shall pay a fine of 50 percent the value of the goods evaded in addition to the amount of customs duty, if the person does not declare or wilfully misrepresents the value or number of imports, export, or transit goods.”

Of the total imports in 2023, import of tobacco and tobacco products from India was reported at 529.74 million and Nu 12.59 million from other countries. Import of cigarettes alone accounted for Nu 507.65 million, equivalent to 109.55 million sticks in 2023.

In the first three months of this year, Bhutan imported Nu 166.92 million worth of tobacco and tobacco products.

Prior to zero tax, the import was recorded at Nu 453.53 million in 2021, Nu 144.23 million in 2020, Nu 0.66 million in 2019, and Nu 1.07 million in 2018.

According to the Bhutan STEPS survey of 2019, the prevalence of current use of tobacco products among 15-69 years was 23.9 percent.

The production and manufacture of tobacco and tobacco products remains banned in the country and smoking in public places is still prohibited.

The sale of tobacco and tobacco products to minors is prohibited. Tobacco business near schools, monasteries, hospitals, clinics, basic health units, and heritage sites is a criminal offence.

 

BRCS empowers youth leaders to combat climate change

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:29

Sherab Lhamo

The Bhutan Red Cross Society’s (BRCS) Y-Adapt climate change training programme provided over 100 young volunteers from five colleges of the Royal University of Bhutan with the necessary knowledge and skills to tackle climate-related issues within their communities.

Y-Adapt or Youth Adapt is an interactive, games-based curriculum, through knowledge sharing, engaging local communities, and inspires youth to act in their communities to adapt to climate change.

The programme utilises gamified learning, where participants progress through levels, receive feedback and rewards, and collaborate on challenges. This method makes learning more engaging and helps retain knowledge, said a trainer, Tandin Wangyel.

The training covered forest conservation, promoting climate-smart agricultural techniques such as terracing and crop diversification with the focus on local solutions.

The training participants from Paro College of Education, College of Science and Technology, College of Language and Culture Studies, Sherubtse College, and Jigme Namgyel Engineering College were also taught about community-based disaster risk reduction, early warning systems, emergency shelters and evacuation plans, among others, to mitigate the impacts of extreme weather events like floods, landslides, and glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs).

BRCS launched the Y-Adapt programme on February 5, 2024 to train youth leaders in climate change adaptation. Twenty-eight youth coordinators from 10 colleges across the country participated in the first phase.

Two trainers, Sonam Dorji and Tandin Wangyel, who completed their Y-Adapt training of trainers on May 28, 2023 in Nepal, facilitated the training.

Participants said the programme provided valuable skills related to climate change adaptation and boosted their confidence. One participant suggested expanding the training to villagers due to its everyday relevance.

From tomorrow, Y-Adapt will train volunteers from Gedu College of Business Studies, Samtse College of Education, College of Natural Resources, and Norbuling Rigter College.

Combating infodemics through community engagement

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:29

Jigmi Wangdi

It is the flu season in Thimphu and any topic on the flu would be followed by free advice of home remedies involving the consumption of ginger water or lemon and honey in hot water.

While these are not harmful and tried home remedies to help bear the inconveniences caused by common flu, sometimes good intentions could lead to infodemics – misinformation or disinformation, causing harm.  Traditional medicine to cure alcoholism and tobacco addiction, consuming bleach, cow urine or garlic to treat Covid-19, were some of the misinformation that authorities had to control in recent years.

Misinformation or fake news spread faster in the digital age with social media providing the medium. Unchecked spread of false health information distorts public trust in established sources of advice like doctors, scientists, and public health authorities.

To address this issue, the WHO South-East Asia Regional Office, in collaboration with the WHO Bhutan Office and the Ministry of Health, is conducting the Annual Regional Forum on Community Engagement and Resilience.

About 60 officials and experts from health ministries from across nine countries from the South East Asian country are present alongside partner agencies, and WHO country offices.

The workshop focuses on empowering communities, emphasising cross-border collaborations and enhancing the capacity of Member States and WHO Country Offices in the Region to manage infodemics.

The WHO South-East Asia Region is home to about a quarter of the world’s population. The region faces persistent health emergencies and infectious diseases like dengue, malaria, tuberculosis, Covid-19, Avian Influenza, Nipah virus, and Anthrax, alongside natural disasters and conflicts.

Additionally, the threat from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, mental health issues, and related disabilities is growing.

The forum highlights the importance of combating the spread of infodemics owing to this reason.

Addressing the inaugural session, Health Minister, Lyonpo Tandin Wangchuk highlighted the basis of the workshop.

“Throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, we witnessed the critical importance of risk communication and infodemic management. The pandemic also highlighted the critical role that communities can play in addressing the challenges presented by misinformation and disinformation,” Lyonpo said.

WHO Representative to Bhutan Dr Bhupinder Kaur Aulakh underscored the pivotal role of communities in public health including emergencies and the need to provide correct and timely information to people.

“This year, we put the spotlight on our communities. Communities need to work together to share correct information to avoid falling prey to mis and dis-information and avoid harm to mental health,” Dr Bhupinder Kaur said.

The focus of the forum on infodemics and the importance of community engagement is because authorities can build trust and foster collective action through the active involvement of community members, leaders, and influencers in disseminating accurate information and addressing misconceptions.

Engaging communities allows for tailored communication strategies that resonate with specific cultural and local contexts, ensuring the information is accessible and credible.

This collaborative approach not only counters the spread of misinformation but also empowers communities to make informed decisions, thereby enhancing the overall effectiveness of public health interventions during crises.

The forum was inaugurated by Lyonpo Tandin Wangchuk, Minister of Health of Bhutan, and Dr Bhupinder Aulakh, along with officials from the Ministries of Health of Member States, and officials from the WHO-SEARO Regional Office and country offices.

 

Monpas grapple with modernisation while safeguarding cultural legacy

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:28

Yangyel Lhaden

The Monpa community in Trongsa, once stewards of age-old customs, finds itself at a pivotal juncture as they welcome modernisation. They are grappling with acknowledging the benefits of modern amenities while safeguarding their cultural legacy, striking a nuanced equilibrium between tradition and advancement.

The three villages of Langthel gewog—Phumzur, Wangling, and Jangbi—are home to the Monpas, considered among the earliest settlers in Bhutan. They worship Jwodurshing, also known as the Black Mountain, their ancestral abode for generations. Historically, they led lives as hunter-gatherers in the forests, practicing shifting cultivation. Traditionally, their attire comprised garments crafted from nettle plant fibres known as Pagay, and they communicate in their native language called Monkha, a unique dialect with roots in the Tibeto-Burman language family.

Presently, the three Monpa villages are home to about 370 individuals residing in around 60 households. With the advent of roads, the villages have witnessed transformative changes. Residents now engage in the cultivation and sale of cash crops like cardamom and oranges. The younger generation attends schools, and basic healthcare facilities are available, alongside other modern conveniences, marking a significant shift towards modernisation in Monpa communities.

Monpas today wear Pagay only during special occasions

Pagay has become increasingly uncommon attire in the villages of Langthel. Nowadays, the residents prefer the simplicity of gho and kira for their everyday clothing, saving their Pagay for special events.

“The government encourages us to wear Pagay during ceremonies to uphold our cultural heritage,” said Jangbi tshogpa, Sonam.

Tawla, an 81-year-old resident of Jangbi, fondly recalled a time when wearing Pagay was considered a luxury.

“Back then, we relied on the forest for sustenance and couldn’t afford new garments,” he said. Pagay, lacking sleeves, provided little defense against the cold winters and rugged terrain, posing challenges to daily life. “We owe gratitude to the monarchy for the advancements in our village, which have made modern amenities accessible to us Monpas.”

In addition to Pagay, another tradition fading in the Monpa village is the practice of sham and shaman, essential for performing the ritual known as Shilaidung. There is a declining interest among educated youths in these traditional practices alive.

The Monpa community maintains a profound bond with nature, expressing their reverence through a ritual known as Shilaidung during winter and spring. This ceremony is dedicated to appeasing their local deity, Jowodurshing, where Monpas offer their initial harvest. Moreover, each village honours its unique local deity: Zhiripa in Wangling, Kipmugchin in Jangbi, and Wompo in Phumzur. While Shilaidung is primarily observed during winter and spring, it is also conducted in the summer to ward off misfortune and safeguard against illness.

Sonam reminisced about the past when Shilaidung was celebrated grandly in the villages. In Tawla’s youth, the event brought together all three Monpa villages, appointing a treasurer for the occasion. However, Sonam expressed concern over the declining number of sham and shamans, fearing for the future of the ritual. Nowadays, Shilaidung has lost its former splendour, with each village organising its own ceremony, leading to diminished unity among the communities.

During Shilaidung, a temporary halt is observed for foraging from the forest for three days, commencing from the bridge that marks the boundary between Mangdechhu and the Monpa community.

Sonam highlighted efforts to reclaim the Monpa narrative and safeguard their vibrant culture, language, and environment.

To support these endeavors, they secured a research grant of Nu one million from the Tribal Trust Foundation in the USA, facilitated by the Tarayana Foundation and Yangphel Adventure Travel.

“One method to pass on knowledge to the youth involves transmitting wisdom from elders to the younger generation through debates conducted in Monkha,” Sonam said.

The 18-month research project began last June.

“Despite Monkha being spoken by everyone in the community, the dialect and purity of the language are gradually fading,”Sonam said. “The Monkha spoken today differs from the language spoken by elders like Tawla.”

Reflecting on the past, Sonam said that there was now a broader emphasis on preserving the unique Monpa culture and traditions. This, he said, helped inspire youth to learn and uphold the heritage.

Sonam expressed a sentiment of both gratitude for the significant improvements in their lives and concern over the fading of their traditions and culture, which are integral to their identity as Monpas. “Nevertheless, we are deeply dedicated to preserving our rich heritage and traditions.”

 

The fruits of their hard work and patience

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:28

Members reap benefits from Community Forest in Kangpara

Neten Dorji

Kangpara—For over seven years, 60-year-old Tashi, along with his fellow villagers, had been protecting  the 1,300 acres of forest in the vicinity of his village Zordung in Kangpara.

The Department of Forest handed over the forest to the community in 2017. Thereafter, the villagers adopted rules and regulations set by their forest user group committee. The community forest today  is a newfound asset for people of Zordung village.

Tashi and  the 110 members of Samtenling Community Forest (SCF) has been sourcing timber and fuelwood needs from the forest since then. To enhance livelihood by depending on the  community forest  a group of villagers also started the Samtenling Furniture House in Zordung. The  CF has economically viable woods.

Two Community Furniture Houses benefit people of Zordung and Merda

“We started a furniture house to make the best use of the community forest timber and generate income from furniture,” said Jamyang Tenzin, chairperson of Samtenling Furniture House. “We deposit Nu 85,000 annually into the community forest account for equal benefits from the furniture house.”

The group aims to create employment opportunities and provide an alternative source of income for the people of Zordung.

Group members said that people have seen the fruits of their labour as they had been involved more intensely to plant trees and preserve the forest.

“The forest means everything to us. It provides timber, fuelwood, and leaf litter. It is the perfect source of income,” said a member, Yeshi Dorji. “Moreover, illegal timber extraction in the village has also reduced.”

According to residents, the CF members planted over 8,500 cypress, pine, and walnut trees for high-quality timber.

Of the six community forests in Kangpara, two have started generating income from the sale of timber and non-wood forest products.They also sell surplus timber or other non-wood forest products.

Zordung Tshogpa, Chimi Rinzin, said that government-reserved forests, with sustainable management, utilisation, and ownership rights granted to groups of communities, have not only helped farmers reap benefits but also aided in preserving the local environment and harvesting its natural resources sustainably.

“Now people can avail themselves of a maximum soft loan of Nu 100,000 from the CF fund at a nominal interest rate of 5 percent per annum. This has helped reduce the poverty rate in the gewog,” said the tshogpa.

He said the two furniture houses have kept people engaged in the community and help deter rural-urban migration.

Gewog Forest Officer Phuntsho Wangdi stated,  “Community Forests (CFs) are a valuable source of timber. We permit timber extraction based on the available resources in the forest and the annual logging operations to sustain the livelihoods of the people.”

He said among the six community forest groups in Kangpara, Tsendaling Furniture House primarily focuses on religious-related wood products, and Zordung Samtenling Furniture House produces home-based wooden products. Members of CF receive skills development training to start commercial production from the CF.

The concept of people’s participation in sustainable forest management in Bhutan started with a Royal decree in 1979. People-oriented forestry programmes aimed at sustainable utilisation of forest resources for income generation and enhancement of livelihoods further received more focus since the early 1990s. The first CF, Dozam in Drametse, Mongar was established in 1997.

A stitch in time saves nine

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:27

Azin Tailors is a solo venture led by a mother who cares for her two-year-old child. She operates her business from her rented apartment due to the high cost of hiring external space. Her income barely covers the monthly rent of Nu 10,000.

Azin excels in her craft, garnering praise for her affordable and dependable service. A businessman in the capital has recognised the value in her work, finding it both cost-effective and trustworthy. This symbiotic relationship benefits both parties: Azin receives orders to stitch a variety of items like bedsheets, curtains, sofa covers, and tablecloths, while the businessman, in turn, supplies these products to hotels and businesses across the capital city.

Azin’s partnership with the businessman proves fortunate, as he prioritises more than just profits, recognising the value of her home-based stitching. While it might seem cheaper to outsource the business across the border to Jaigaon, Azin offers more than just tailoring services. She goes above and beyond, working tirelessly overnight to fulfill demand, actively listening to her partner’s feedback, and ensuring her partner faces no difficulties

This small business holds significant potential to impact the livelihoods of thousands of individuals. Despite possessing the capability, small businesses often encounter limited opportunities. There’s a prevailing belief that outsourcing across borders is more cost-effective, disregarding considerations of quality and post-sales support.

The Bhutan Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s (BCCI) plan to initiate local manufacturing of school uniforms is commendable. Currently, Indian tailors in Dadgari, Mela Bazar, or Jaigaon dominate this market, causing a substantial flow of revenue out of Bhutan. Bhutanese tailors witness this outflow with envy as millions worth of business cross the border. These Indian suppliers capitalize on the demand, offering uniforms in exchange for a commission ranging from 5 to 10 percent.

While students may not voice concerns directly, parents frequently express dissatisfaction with mass-produced ghos, kiras, and tegos, which often lack comfort, especially during the eight-month school year. BCCI could facilitate the involvement of Bhutanese weavers, manufacturers, and tailors in producing high-quality, comfortable school uniforms. This initiative would bring benefits to students, parents, and local businesses alike.

Despite various initiatives aimed at training thousands of unemployed individuals in tailoring, many of these skilled tailors find themselves without sufficient business opportunities. Moreover, there is a prevalent issue of poor-quality, mass-produced school uniforms, which leaves both consumers dissatisfied and the textile industry struggling. The local textile industry faces challenges in producing affordable textiles suitable for school uniforms. Even if they manage to produce such textiles, the costs of production and maintaining quality make them expensive options for consumers.

One viable approach is to explore the potential of replacing the low-quality garments produced by mills, which prioritise quantity over quality. While it may be challenging to entirely replace the dependence on mass-produced textiles from Indian mills, addressing the stitching issue is crucial. Many say that stitching quality is a significant concern even with the current supply chain.

BCCI’s tax break offer on the import of raw materials, along with financial incentives and the provision of necessary machinery, presents a promising solution. By facilitating access to essential resources, this initiative could empower local tailors to craft higher-quality ghos and kiras for the numerous students in need. With increased business opportunities for tailors, there’s potential for a positive impact on the local economy.

Moreover, by regulating both the cost and quality, authorities can ensure that the interests of both producers and consumers are protected, fostering a sustainable and mutually beneficial environment.

Tax reform vital for Bhutan’s economic growth

Wed, 05/15/2024 - 09:26

Thinley Namgay  

The country is grappling with significant challenges in its tax policy, tax administration system, and Information Technology (IT) infrastructure.

These weaknesses impede the establishment of an efficient taxation system and the provision of improved tax services to the citizens.

According to the Department of Revenue and Customs (DRC) records, Bhutan presently counts 116,000 taxpayers, including corporate, business, and personal income taxpayers. The current tax to Gross Domestic Product (GDP) ratio is approximately 13 percent.

DRC’s Director General, Sonam Jamtsho, said that Bhutan’s current tax policy  relied  on assumptions, incentives, and deductions.

He noted that the Income Tax Act 2001 has become outdated and fails to accommodate the changing landscape of digital assets, cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, and blockchain technology.

He made these remarks during the inaugural national dialogue on tax justice, enhanced compliance, and a renewed social contract for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the Jigme Singye Wangchuck School of Law in Paro on May 13.

Presently, the top 20 percent of taxpayers in Bhutan contribute 80 percent of the total tax revenue. Sonam Jamtsho said that there was a need to reassess this situation, as the country treated all taxpayers uniformly until now.

He said that citizens were willing to fulfil their tax obligations, but the online system was not operating efficiently. “To pay income tax, we are still reliant on the old RAMIS system, which is not very effective.”

Tax officers, he said, were burdened with extensive manual tasks, diverging from their primary mandate of tax assessment and collection.

DRC has developed  an electronic customs management system (eCMS) to streamline online import and export procedures. It is also revising the Income Tax Act to make it more relevant to modern times.

Sonam Jamtsho said that the aim was to simplify procedures, regulations, and rationalise tax ranges, along with the introduction of new provisions.

To reduce the workload on tax officers, the DRC has recruited additional staff to handle manual tasks such as data entry.

 

Tax and SDGs

Robust finance is seen as an important component in fulfilling the 17 SDGs under the 2030 agenda of Sustainable Development. To improve the financial aspect of the country, a good taxation system is one of the key elements.

Resident representative of UNDP, Mohammad Younus, said that taxation was not merely a means of revenue collection but also a profound social contract between citizens and the state.

He said that a fair and progressive tax system not only bolstered economic growth but also fostered social cohesion and good governance.”It is a tool for shaping behavior, promoting environmental sustainability, and advancing social justice.”

 

Can Asia and Pacific Region fulfil SDGs?

Mohammad Younus drew attention to the recent United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP) SDG progress report, which presents a grim outlook for the region.

“The region is poised to achieve only one-third of the necessary progress by 2030. What is even more unsettling is that the region will not meet any of the 17 goals by the agreed deadline,” he said.

He said that effective tax reform had the potential to address the current economic downturns in the Asia-Pacific region. Achieving SDGs required substantial financial resources, he said, citing an estimated annual funding gap of USD 4.2 trillion.

He noted that Bhutan reported a tax-to-GDP ratio of 11.34 percent in the fiscal year 2021-2022, lower than the average tax-to-GDP ratios in theAsia-Pacific region (19.8 percent) and the OECD region (34.31 percent).

To change this trajectory, he said that UNDP’s Tax for SDGs Project provided essential assistance to Bhutan, including tailored training for tax officials on tax auditing, tax treaty negotiations, and the design of a Bhutan-specific model tax treaty.

He also announced upcoming initiatives, such as an advanced-level course on tax and SDGs for the DRC and a workshop for Members of Parliament on the linkages between tax and SDGs.

 

འབྲུག་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ལས་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ ཨང་༢ པ་ཐོན་ཏེ་ དངུལ་གྱི་རྟགས་མ་ཐོབ་ཡོདཔ།

Tue, 05/14/2024 - 16:33

བཀྲིས་ཕུན་ཚོགས།

༉ སྤ་རོ་ལས་ སྐྱེས་ལོ་༣༧ ལང་མི་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ ཐིམ་ཕུག་ གླང་རྒྱུག་ཕར་ཁ་ལུ་ཡོད་པའི་ མདའ་རྩེད་ཐང་ནང་ ཐེངས་༢ པའི་ འབྲུག་ཆེ་རིམ་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་འབད་མི་ལས་ དྲག་ཤོས་ཨང་༢ པ་ཐོན་ཏེ་ དངུལ་གྱི་རྟགས་མ་ཐོབ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

སྤྱི་ཟླ་༥ པའི་ཚེས་༡༢ ལུ་ འགོ་འདྲེན་འཐབ་མི་ འབྲུག་ཆེ་མཐོའི་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ རྒྱ་གར་ལས་ པཱནཌ་ཡ་ལ་ ཀའུ་ཌ་རི་དང་མཉམ་ མཐའ་བཅད་རྐྱབ་པའི་སྐབས་ སྐུགས་༤ གིས་ ཕམ་སོཔ་ད་ དེ་ཡང་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ བསྡོམས་ཀྱིས་སྐུགས་༡༣༩ ཐོབ་ད་ ཨང་དང་པ་ཐོན་མི་གིས་ སྐུགས་༡༤༣ ཐོབ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

འདི་བཟུམ་སྦེ་ ད་རེས་ཀྱི་ རྩེད་འགྲན་ནང་ འབྲུག་ལས་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ རྟགས་མ་ཐོབ་མི་ ཕུད་རྡོག་གཅིག་ལས་བརྒལ་མེདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

ང་རའི་ཧོངས་ལས་ གསེར་གྱི་རྟགས་མ་འཐོབ་ཚུགསཔ་འབད་ནི་ལུ་ རྩ་འགེངས་ཞིནམ་ལས་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་ཡོད་རུང་ ཨང་༢ པ་ལས་བརྒལ་ཐོན་མ་ཚུགས་ཟེར་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ སླབ་ཨིན་པས།

སྤྱི་ལོ་༢༠༢༢ ལུ་ འབྲུག་ལུ་ ཆེ་མཐོ་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་འབད་མི་ལས་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ དྲག་ཤོས་ཨང་༡ པ་ཐོན་ཏེ་ གསེར་གྱི་རྟགས་མ་ཐོབ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་འབདཝ་ད་ དུས་ཅི་ཡང་ དྲག་ཤོས་ཨང་༢ པ་ཐོན་ཏེ་ དངུལ་གྱི་རྟགས་མ་ཐོབ་མི་དེ་གཙོ་བོ་ར་ འབྲུག་ཨོ་ལིམ་པིག་ཚོགས་པ་དང་  འབྲུག་མདའ་རྩེད་ཚོགས་པ་གིས་ གོ་སྐབས་བྱིན་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ ང་རའི་ལྕོགས་གྲུབ་དང་ རིག་རྩལ་ཚུ་ སྟོན་ཚུགས་ཟེར་ རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ བཤདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

རྟ་མགྲིན་རྡོ་རྗེ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ འབྲུག་པའི་མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་གིས་ གྲུབ་འབྲས་ལེགས་ཤོམ་སྟོན་བ་ཚུགས་མི་དེ་ གཙོ་བོ་ར་ བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་མི་ཚུ་ལུ་ ཟླ་ངོ་༢ ལས་བརྒལ་ སྦྱོང་བརྡར་འབད་མ་ཚུགསཔ་མ་ཚད་ ཉིནམ་༡ ནང་ དུས་ཡུན་ཆུ་ཚོད་༢ ལས་བརྒལ་ སྦྱོང་བརྡར་འབད་མ་ཚུགས་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ ཨིན་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

མ་གཞི་ འབྲུག་པའི་རྩེད་འགྲན་པ་ཚུ་ལུ་ ཕྱི་རྒྱལ་མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་དང་གཅིག་ཁར་ རྩེད་འགྲན་མ་འབད་བའི་ཧེ་མ་དང་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་ཞིནམ་ལས་ གཏན་འཇགས་སྦེ་ སྦྱོང་བརྡར་དང་ ལྷབ་སྦྱང་འབད་དེ་བཞག་དགོཔ་འདུག་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

དེ་འབདཝ་ད་ སྤྱིར་བཏང་ལུ་ ཕྱི་རྒྱལ་གྱི་རྩེད་འགྲན་དང་ ནང་འཁོད་རྩེད་འགྲན་མཇུག་བསྡུ་ཞིནམ་ལས་ བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་མི་དང་ མ་གཏོགས་མི་མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ག་ར་ལུ་ རྒྱུན་མ་ཆདཔ་སྦེ་ སྦྱོང་བརྡར་དང་ སློབ་སྟོན་འབད་དགོཔ་འདུག་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

ཉིནམ་༢ ཀྱི་  འབྲུག་ཆེ་རིམ་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ འབྲུག་དང་ རྒྱ་གར་ དེ་ལས་ བང་ལ་དེཤ་ལས་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་མི་ ཕྱི་རྒྱལ་མདའ་གཞུ་ཐོག་ལས་ མདའ་རྐྱབ་མི་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་༣༠ གིས་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་ཡོདཔ་བཞིན་དུ་ དེ་ཁར་ ཨམ་སྲུ་༡༢ ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

འདས་པའི་ལོ་དང་ཕྱདཔ་ད་ དུས་ཅི་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་༨ ཡར་སེང་སོང་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་དང་ འགོ་དཔོན་ཚུ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ འབྲུག་ཆེ་རིམ་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་མི་ཡར་སེང་སོང་ཡོདཔ་མ་ཚད་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་དྲག་ཤོས་ཚུ་ཡང་ ཕྱི་རྒྱལ་ལས་ བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་མི་གིས་ ཐོན་དོ་ཡོདཔ་ལས་ འབྲུག་པའི་བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་མི་ཚུ་གིས་ རིག་རྩལ་དང་ ཉམས་མྱོང་ལེ་ཤ་ཅིག་ར་ ཐོབ་ཚུགས་པས་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

རྒྱལ་ཁབ་༣ གྱི་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་གི་བར་ན་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་མི་ལས་ རྟགས་མ་མཐོ་ཤོས་ར་ རྒྱ་གར་ལས་ཐོན་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

འབྲུག་གི་ཨམ་སྲུ་ཚུ་གི་གྲས་ལས་ མཐའ་བཅད་འོག་མའི་རྩེད་འགྲན་འབདཝ་ད་ རྡོ་རྗེ་སྒྲོལ་མ་དེ་ ཕམ་བཏང་ཡོདཔ་ད་ དེ་ཡང་ རྡོ་རྗེ་སྒྲོལ་མ་གིས་ སྐུགས་༡༤༠ ཐོབ་པའི་སྐབས་ རྒྱ་གར་ལས་ ས་ལོ་ནི་ ཀིར་རར་གྱིས་ སྐུགས་༡༤༢ ཐོབ་ཡོདཔ་ཨིན་པས།

འབྲུག་མདའ་རྩེད་ཚོགས་པའི་ སློབ་སྟོན་པ་ བཀྲིས་ཚེ་རིང་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ འབྲུག་ལས་ རྩེད་རིགས་ནང་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་མི་ཚུ་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་དྲག་ཤོས་ཐོན་མི་ཚུ་ གདམ་ཁ་རྐྱབ་ཞིནམ་ལས་ བཅའ་མར་གཏོགས་བཅུག་པའི་ཁར་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་དྲག་ཤོས་༤ དེ་ རྒྱལ་སྤྱི་གི་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ དོ་འགྲན་འབད་ཐབས་ལུ་ གདམ་ཁ་འབད་དེ་ཡོད་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

འབྲུག་ལས་ དྲག་ཤོས་ཐོན་མི་ཨང་༤ པ་ཚུན་འབད་མི་ཚུ་ དུས་ཅི་ སྤྱི་ཟླ་༡༡ པའི་ནང་ བེང་ཀོག་ལུ་ ཨེ་ཤི་ཡཱན་རྒྱལ་རྟགས་ཀྱི་དོན་ལུ་ རྩེད་འགྲན་འབད་བར་འགྱོ་ནི་ཨིན་པས།

ཆེ་རིམ་མདའ་རྩེད་འགྲན་བསྡུར་ནང་ འབད་བ་ཅིན་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་གིས་ གཞུ་འཐེན་ནི་དང་ མདའ་གཏང་ཐབས་ཀྱི་ ཅ་ཆས་ སའེཊི་དང་ ཊི་གར་ཚུ་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་མི་ལུ་བརྟེན་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་ སྤུས་ཚད་དང་ལྡནམ་སྦེ་ འཐོན་ནི་ལུ་ ཐོ་ཕོག་ཡི་ཟེར་ཨིན་པས།

མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་གིས་ སླབ་མིའི་ནང་ འབྲུག་རང་ལུགས་མདའ་རྩེད་ཚོགས་པ་གིས་ ད་རུང་ ཊི་གར་དང་ སའེཊི་ཚུ་ ལག་ལེན་འཐབ་ཆོགཔ་སྦེ་ གནང་བ་བྱིན་པ་ཅིན་ མདའ་རྩེདཔ་ཚུ་ལུ་ ཕན་ཐོགས་འབྱུང་ཚུགས་ནི་མས་ཟེར་ ཨིན་པའི་གནས་ཚུལ།

Thousands expected to attend Rinchen Terzoed Jaglung

Tue, 05/14/2024 - 15:31

…Bhutan’s spiritual extravaganza commences on May 29

Thousands of devotees from across the country are expected to attend the three and a half months Rinchen Terzoed Wangchhen, an event featuring oral transmission, empowerment, and instructions of the treasury of precious termas, at Ugyen Pema Woeling Zangdo Pelri in Bongdey, Paro.

Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche will confer the empowerment of Rinchen Terzoed Wang from May 29 to September 13.

Khentrul Karma Jigme, the main organiser of the event, said  he expects more than 10,000 trulkus, lamas, khenpos, monks, nuns, lay monks, and devotees to receive the kawang (transmission of spiritual treasure teachings). “A large Wangkhang or empowerment hall is being constructed in front of the Zangdo Pelri complex to accommodate around 12,000 devotees,” he said.

Trulkus, khenpos, and monks of Zangdo Pelri will conduct a four-day tshogkhor and prayers from May 23 to 26 for the successful completion of empowerment and teachings without any obstacles over three and a half months.

Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche

The initiation will begin on May 29 with the Mandala opening of Vajrasattva of Mindroling tradition and, in line with the ground ritual, initiate the main part of Vajrasattva Sadhana ceremony of Rinchen Terzoed.

The Rinchen Terzoed

According to the Buddhism Forum, Rinchen Terzoed, often abbreviated as Terzö or Rinchen Terzoed Chhenmo, denotes a 63-volume compilation of revealed texts, or terma, meticulously assembled in the 19th century by the Rimed masters Jamgön Kongtrül Lodrö Thaye and Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo. This significant collection encompasses crucial terma concealed by Guru Padmasambhava, Yeshe Tsogyal, Vimalamitra, and their primary disciples during the 8th and 9th centuries.

The Rinchen Terzoed holds immense sacredness and serves as a vital transmission in the Nyingma tradition. The Buddhism Forum stated that Masters like Guru Rinpoche, Vimalamitra, and Vairotsana imparted teachings that were concealed for the benefit of future generations, later unearthed by eminent masters spanning the 11th to 19th centuries in the Nyingma tradition.

The collection of terma (hidden treasures) teachings revealed by 108 tertöns was compiled by Khenkong Chogsum, Jamyang Khyentse Wangpo, Kongtrul Yonten Jamtsho, and Chogyur Dechen Lingpa in the 1850s. “This is the first time Shechen Rabjam Rinpoche is empowering Rinchen Terzoed in Bhutan,” Khentrul Karma Jigme said.

Rabjam Rinpoche is the seventh in the line of the Rabjam succession and is the grandson and spiritual heir of Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche. Since his grandfather’s passing in 1991, Rabjam Rinpoche has taken the responsibility of transmitting Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche’s teachings and is bringing his vision for the preservation of Buddhist teaching and culture to fruition.

 

Interest of Devotees

Meanwhile, to ensure hygiene at the ceremony, the organisers have constructed 64 units of pit toilets for male and another 56 toilets for female devotees on one-acre private land.

More than 60 water taps with wash basins were also installed at both sides of the Wangkhang (empowerment hall). Khentrul emphasised the importance of maintaining sanitation and hygiene, especially during peak monsoon, with 20 imported laborers assigned to clean and monitor toilets and other sanitation services throughout the Wangchhen event.

Housing Woes

The sacred event has caused a housing shortage in and around Bongdey, on the periphery of Tsongdue town.

Some devotees from as far as Mongar and Trashigang have booked rooms in private homes since January after hearing about the Rinchen Terzoed in Bongdey. Residents and  house owners have taken advantage of the religious event and are charging high rent, according to organisers.

Some landowners have constructed temporary wooden houses near the Wangkhang and are renting them out to be used as shops. One resident said that one small room is rented out for Nu 20,000 a month. Some landowners also leased out their open space for Nu 6,000 each per month to pitch tents on a decimal of land.

One building owner claimed that his three-bedroom house with two toilets, one sitting room, and one choesham (altar) was rented out to a trulku for Nu 40,000 per month. “It will be difficult to find a space to rent,” he said.

A couple from Thimphu went to Paro looking for a house to rent but had to return home without any success. “We were told that all houses were booked,” they said.

 

Contributed by

Rinzin Wangchuk

 

Addressing agri-food emissions for sustainable future

Tue, 05/14/2024 - 15:29

YK Poudel

The yearly average agricultural and food-related emissions in Bhutan are on the rise.

According to a recent report, greenhouse gases (GHGs) for Bhutan were measured at 0.7 megatons of carbon dioxide equivalent  (MtCO2eq), comprising 41.5 percent of total emissions.

The per capita emissions was reported at 0.9 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (tCO2eq) per person.

Recent studies conducted by the World Bank under the title “Recipe for a Livable Planet: Achieving Net Zero Emissions in the Agri-food System”, shed light on both challenges and opportunities for mitigating emissions in the agricultural and food sectors.

“Addressing the emissions from agri-food is not just essential for environmental sustainability but also for achieving broader global development goals,” the report stated.

The agri-food sector contributes to almost one-third of GHG emissions, surpassing the combined emissions from the heat and electricity sectors. The majority of these emissions come from developing countries, highlighting the need for a worldwide approach to mitigation efforts.

To restrict global warming to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, emissions from the agri-food sector must reach net zero by 2050. Failing to meet this target could put the world’s climate objectives at risk, emphasizing the urgency of taking immediate actions.

According to the report, however, the current funding allocated for reducing emissions in the agri-food sector falls relatively short of what is needed, indicating a major disparity in the distribution of climate finance.

“There is a massive gap between the importance of the agri-food system for climate change mitigation and the financing it receives,” the report stated.  “Overall, climate finance has almost doubled over the last decade but climate financing for the agri-food system falls far short of its needs.”

The report adds that investing in agri-food emission reduction presents a substantial opportunity with substantial returns.

Although the second Nationally Determined Contributions of Bhutan Report emphasise agri-food system and GHG emissions, the specifications and areas of focus are not well stipulated.

According to the World Bank report, addressing agri-food emissions requires a holistic approach that considers the entire value chain, including land use change and post-production activities.

 

Looking ahead

The agri-food system is vast and largely untapped reservoir of low-cost climate change action.

On a global scale, annual investments will need to surge by an estimated 18-fold, reaching USD 260 billion per year to halve current agri-food emissions by 2030 and steer the world toward achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.

Effective mitigation of agri-food emissions demands collaboration among governments, businesses, farmers, and consumers on a national scale because different income groups face unique challenges and opportunities.

High-income countries can set an example by promoting renewable energy and encouraging consumers to prefer lower-emission foods. Meanwhile, middle-income countries have substantial potential for emission reduction through effective land use management and the adoption of sustainable agricultural practices.

At the same time, low-income countries can concentrate on preserving forests and implementing climate-smart agricultural techniques to foster green and inclusive growth.

Governments and international organisations must prioritise agri-food emission reduction in their climate action agendas. This includes repurposing subsidies, incentivising low-emission technologies, facilitating international cooperation and investment forums in agri-food sectors.

Principally, the report recommends the inclusion of smallholder farmers and women in decision-making processes to ensure a fair transition.

 

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